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Preparing a Non-Agile Business for Agile

By John Cooke, Founder and Managing Director, Black Pepper Software

Earlier this year, Gartner predicted the changing face of application development would result in traditional development approaches failing. Although it’s too early to state whether such predictions will galvanise the market, it’s clear Agile is now the approach of choice for many software development teams in businesses of all sizes.

Companies are recognising the methodology is no longer solely applied to just the technology development. It can have a positive impact in a number of different practices and processes outside of the IT team.

John Cooke, a founder and managing director of Black Pepper Software highlights a number of fundamental areas of business where the Agile approach can produce demonstrable results and puts the case forward for complete adoption. Business agility

Agile isn’t an approach businesses simply switch on or off on a whim, they must fully commit to the approach to truly reap the benefits. This often requires widespread change throughout an organisation which can be perceived as onerous, but once embraced, produces company-wide results. Specific areas include:

Eliminating waste – The term ‘streamline’ has long been a buzzword banded around by businesses which believe they are working as efficiently as possible. However, some organisations are not being ruthless enough, simply paying lip service to the idea of change, rather than whole heartedly evaluating each area of the business to truly understand where problems lie and drive efficiencies.

An often over-looked area for example is meetings. These play a vital role in almost every business and it’s astounding so much time continues to be wasted in them. There is a culture of professionals ‘putting an hour in the diary’ for meetings, resulting in a group of employees taking a large portion of their working day to discuss issues at length, when a...

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